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Bruce Rosen, MD, PhD

How Body Imagers Helped to Invent Functional Brain Imaging &
What the Future Holds

Dr. Rosen is Director of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Laurence Lamson Robbins Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. He is also the Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital.  Dr. Rosen received his MD degree from Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia in 1982 and his PhD degree from MIT in 1984, and subsequently completed an internship and residency at Mass General and research fellowships at Mass General and the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST). He joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School in 1987.

Dr. Rosen has received numerous awards in recognition of his contributions to biomedical imaging, including the Outstanding Researcher award from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the Rigshospitalet’s International KFJ Prize from the University of Copenhagen/Rigshospitalet. He is a Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM); a Gold Medal winner from ISMRM for his contributions to the field of functional neuroimaging; a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; and a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Inventors.

Among his many achievements in the biomedical sciences, Dr. Rosen is a pioneer in the field of functional neuroimaging. In the early 1990s, he oversaw development of the technique functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measures the hemodynamic and metabolic changes associated with brain activity in both health and disease. More recently, his work has focused on the integration of fMRI data with information from other imaging modalities, including positron emission tomography (PET), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and noninvasive optical imaging. Many of the tools he has introduced are now used by research centers and hospitals around the world to study and evaluate patients with stroke, brain tumors, dementia, and neurologic and psychological disorders.